Scott Kay


Scott Kay is a software engineer at eMoney Advisor working with a talented team of developers to continuously improve and optimize their application stack and server infrastructure. He has been involved with .NET since it’s inception, first as a Microsoft Evangelist and continuing through his local developer community. Beyond .NET, he dabbles in the Go programming language and data/multimedia compression.

What’s New In C# 7

Saturday, February 25th, 2017 at 10:00 am

It’s never been a more exciting time to be a C# developer, as the language has shifted from being a proprietary Microsoft technology to an open source project with a modern compiler service which makes it easier to add new features. C# 7 builds on this framework to bring us new syntax for working with data structures in a more functional-like and friction-less way, allowing us to reduce our boiler plate code and more clearly express our intent.

In this session, you’ll learn the new C# 7 syntax through code demos and see how the new features such as tuples and pattern matching can help simplify common coding scenarios.

Write Better C# Code With Live Analyzers

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016 at 11:30 am

Analyzers enable project teams to codify their best practices and library authors to provide extra guidance on their usage, all exposed through Visual Studio’s hints and compiler messages. With the help of the .Net Compiler Platform (codename Roslyn), it’s never been easier to build and share your own live code analyzer. In this session, you’ll learn step-by-step how to create and share code analyzers for C# code utilizing the Roslyn API. You’ll also learn how to create code fixes for your teammates or users to immediately apply and get back on the track to writing clean code. No prior experience with the Roslyn API is necessary or assumed.

Write Better Code With Live Analyzers

Saturday, April 9th, 2016 at 3:00 pm

Visual Studio and Roslyn make it easier than ever for developers to provide live code analyzers than can emit errors and warnings as you type. Codify your team’s best practices and let Visual Studio enforce them in real time.

In this session, you’ll learn step-by-step how to create Visual Studio extensions for analyzing code using the Roslyn API. You’ll also learn how to create code fixes for your teammates to immediately apply and get back on track to writing clean code. No prior experience with the Roslyn API is necessary or assumed.

What’s New In C# 6

Saturday, April 9th, 2016 at 11:30 am

C# 6 introduces many new features aimed to reduce clutter and better express the intent of your code. In this session, you’ll learn all the new syntax through code demos and see how the new features can help simplify common coding patterns. We’ll also explore improvements to the .Net runtime that you can take advantage of in C# and peek at what’s on the horizon for C# Next.

What’s New In C# 6

Saturday, October 10th, 2015 at 11:30 am

C# 6 introduces many new language features to help reduce boilerplate and better express the intent of your code. In this session, you’ll learn through code demos the details of the new syntax and how it can help you simplify common coding patterns. We’ll cover string interpolation, auto property initializers, null conditional operators, expression bodied members, the using static clause, and much more.

Fundamentals of GoLang

Saturday, October 10th, 2015 at 8:30 am

Go/GoLang is a powerful C-like open source programming language featuring a (relatively) clean syntax, originally created by Google. It is supported by a growing community and is used by popular projects such as Docker and CoreOS.

In this session, you’ll learn the fundamentals of Go’s object model and approach to concurrency. I’ll demonstrate how to use Go’s tools to assist with code formatting, testing, compilation, and race detection.

.NET Compiler Platform

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015 at 5:30 pm

The .NET Compiler Platform (code-name Roslyn) is an open source project which includes new C# and VB compilers that will ship with .NET 2015. The compilers have been re-designed from the ground up to expose their internal logic as public APIs. Previous versions functioned as “black boxes” to generate assemblies from source code. If you wanted to extend the language with analysis tools like StyleCop, IntelliSense, or ReSharper you needed to re-invent a lot of the same logic. Now, such tools (including Visual Studio itself!) can be built on top of the same APIs as the compiler.

In this session, you’ll learn through code samples how to use the new C# compiler APIs to effortlessly create an interactive scripting console, analyze the semantic structure of your code, and extend the Visual Studio IDE.

.NET Compiler Platform

Saturday, March 21st, 2015 at 1:30 pm

The .NET Compiler Platform (code-name Roslyn) is an open source project which includes new C# and VB compilers that will ship with .NET 2015. The compilers have been re-designed from the ground up to expose their internal logic as public APIs. Previous versions functioned as “black boxes” to generate assemblies from source code. If you wanted to extend the language with analysis tools like StyleCop, IntelliSense, or ReSharper you needed to re-invent a lot of the same logic. Now, such tools (including Visual Studio itself!) can be built on top of the same APIs as the compiler.

In this session, you’ll learn through code samples how to use the new C# compiler APIs to effortlessly create an interactive scripting console, analyze the semantic structure of your code, and extend the Visual Studio IDE.

Bending C# To Your Will In .Net 5.0

Saturday, November 23rd, 2013 at 11:30 am

The current C# compiler works as a “black box” to generate an assembly from source code. If you want to extend the language with analysis tools (like StyleCop, IntelliSense, or ReSharper), scripting environments, or domain-specific language features, you need to re-invent a lot of the same parsing logic. The next version of C# and VB.Net will include entirely new compilers (codename Roslyn) designed from the ground up to expose the internal logic as public APIs.

In this session, you’ll learn through code samples how to use the new C# compiler APIs to effortlessly create an interactive scripting console, add your own domain-specific language features, and analyze the semantic structure of your code. We’ll showcase projects which use the new compiler APIs to create powerful utilities and IDE features.

Google Go: Learn A New Language

Saturday, May 11th, 2013 at 10:00 am

Programming languages are each adept at solving certain kinds of problems. As developers, we should be exposed to different varieties of language to learn their strengths, their weaknesses, and where they are best applied. Google Go is a relatively young programming language with a unique approach and C-like syntax.

In this session, you’ll learn the syntax and distinctive features of the Google Go (GoLang) programming language.  We’ll walk through code samples and identify the kinds of solutions where it might be best applied.

JavaScript: Things You Probably Don’t Know, But Should

Saturday, November 17th, 2012 at 3:10 pm

The mechanics of how JavaScript operates under the hood is often misunderstood due to its syntactical similarity with other C-style languages such as C++, C#, and Java. It’s important to have a deeper understanding of how the JavaScript language works to debug the really tough problems and to take advantage of the real power the language provides.

In this session, we’ll explore and demonstrate what makes JavaScript unique in comparison to other C-style languages. Specifically, we’ll discuss JavaScript’s type system, equality syntax, scoping and closures, and prototype inheritance

This talk will be presented by Max Pollack and Scott Kay of eMoney Advisor.