SignalR


You must bring a laptop. Don’t forget that power supply. We recommend more than 1 Gb of RAM and at least 10 Gb of free disk space. External USB or Firewire drives really help. We will help you get organized and install the right software for continued virtual fun! We have wireless Internet access. If not, make sure that all required software is on your machine when you arrive.

Over the next six months we will cover the latest Microsoft tools for responsive web site development. The series starts with layout and controller basics. This will be followed by sessions on jQuery and plug-ins, templating tools like jsRender, scaffolding, REST, WebAPI, SPAs and SignalR.

These Hands-On Labs will use Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2012 or Visual Web Developer 2010 Express Service Pack 1. Visual Studio 2012 is recommended and you won’t need to install anything to complete the labs. If you are using Visual Web Developer 2010 you must install the components below. You can install all of them by clicking the following links:

Nick Berardi introduces SignalR development by showing how to build a simple browser-based chat application. You will add the SignalR library to an empty ASP.NET web application, create a hub class for sending messages to clients, and create an HTML page that lets users send and receive chat messages. This session will continue and build upon your knowledge of ASP.NET MVC that you have learned in previous classes.
After completing a SignalR tutorial, you decide to dive into a real project.  That’s when the questions start.  How do my services call into listening clients independently?  Can I use this technology in places other than just web sites?  And most importantly… when it doesn’t work, how do I figure out what’s wrong?
Chris Gomez will start with a working ASP.NET web site that retrieves data from a server.  We’ll upgrade it so the server uses SignalR to tell clients when the data is updated and what has changed.  Flipping this model around has profound benefits that you may just want to use in every project from now on!

Chris Gomez

Chris has been writing Windows software professionally for 19 years. His day jobs have included developing kiosks for theme parks and retail stores and building portfolio analytics for commercial lending. Today His hobby for game development started much earlier by making games using ASCII characters in text mode using BASICA. However, in his free time, you’ll find Chris playing the latest games on his Xbox 360 or Windows Phone 7.

Nick Berardi

Nick is the President at Managed Fusion (managedfusion.com), a U.S.-based company that specializes in the fields of software architecture / development, usability engineering, and cloud-based computing initiatives with a strong focus on .NET, the Web, SEO, SEM, and Microsoft technologies.

  • He co-authored the title “ASP.NET MVC 1.0 Website Programming: Problem – Design – Solution” published by Wrox.
  • He maintains an active blog, Coder Journal (coderjournal.com), and does a lot of public speaking of web based approaches to software development, particularly evangelizing ASP.NET MVC, REST, and jQuery.
  • He contributes to the open source project ELMAH (code.google.com/p/elmah/) which is an application-wide error logging facility.
  • He developed URL Rewriter (urlrewriter.codeplex.com), a .NET model which handles URL rewriting and reverse proxying for IIS 6 and IIS 7.
  • He developed Fluent Cassandra (fluentcassandra.com), a .NET library for interacting with the high scalable open source NoSQL database Cassandra.

To find Nick follow him on twitter @nberardi or contact him on his blog (coderjournal.com).